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Half Letter Press

As we get ready to send a new book to the printer this week, we just wanted to remind you that we have great books in stock, like a recent one we published: 
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (MBGC) examines the political practice and visual propaganda of a now-obscure women’s poster, printmaking, and street art collective based in New York City between 1975 and 1983. For a brief, intense period of time, the MBGC collaborated on projects against racism and in solidarity with national liberation movements, producing many beautiful multicolored silkscreened prints, note cards, banners, posters, and other print ephemera before withdrawing into the isolation of a sectarian and militaristic political line. By 1982 its core members were in prison or underground. Revolution as an Eternal Dream calls up the perpetual desire for revolution, but also the frailty of such dreams.
Please spread the word about this publication. We will give away a free copy signed by Mary Patten to one random person that reblogs this post. You have until midnight Central time on September 16th to reblog this and then we’ll pick a winner.
[Click the book cover for more details and a look inside]

As we get ready to send a new book to the printer this week, we just wanted to remind you that we have great books in stock, like a recent one we published: 

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (MBGC) examines the political practice and visual propaganda of a now-obscure women’s poster, printmaking, and street art collective based in New York City between 1975 and 1983. For a brief, intense period of time, the MBGC collaborated on projects against racism and in solidarity with national liberation movements, producing many beautiful multicolored silkscreened prints, note cards, banners, posters, and other print ephemera before withdrawing into the isolation of a sectarian and militaristic political line. By 1982 its core members were in prison or underground. Revolution as an Eternal Dream calls up the perpetual desire for revolution, but also the frailty of such dreams.

Please spread the word about this publication. We will give away a free copy signed by Mary Patten to one random person that reblogs this post. You have until midnight Central time on September 16th to reblog this and then we’ll pick a winner.

[Click the book cover for more details and a look inside]

Book Review: Revolution as an Eternal Dream by Mary Patten
By Daniel Tucker

Posted on March 26, 2012 
This Book Review appeared in Afterimage Vol. 39 No. 5 in the Spring of 2012:
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective
by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette/Half Letter Press/2011/84 pp./$13.00 (sb) [Purchase it here]
It is all too rare to see social movement history interwoven with art history—so what a pleasure it is to read Mary Patten’s memoir, which does exactly that. Patten recounts, through short essays paired with full-color graphics reproductions, her days in the May 19th Communist organization, working with particular commitment in the graphics and propaganda subcommittee known as the Madame Binh Graphics Collective from 1975 to 1983.
The text is sewn together with prose that critically comments on cadre activism from a mature, deeply honest, and self-reflexive position. Patten writes, “We were on the margins of the margins, the periphery of the periphery: far left or ‘ultra left’ in our intensely florid and dramatic politics.[PAGE 11]“ Later she introduces how art fit into these politics, elegantly explaining their approach to authorship and anonymity: “Those who choose this kind of political art practice find their lives intensely enriched and multiply connected to worlds beyond what they ever knew previously; worlds where possibilities beckon, and where ‘losing oneself’ also means sacrifice, sometimes to the point of self-obliteration.”[PAGE 49]
This book is unusual for a number of reasons. It is less a book than an essay, but an essay that is elaborated upon and contextualized by both a preface and an afterword. It is less a history than a memoir; a catalog, but without an accompanying exhibition. It is similar to a pamphlet, but with full color artwork never found in leftist propaganda.
I highly recommend this book to printmakers, politically motivated artists of any kind, and anyone interested in the way that art intersects with leftist history in general. Patten’s approach leaves many questions open concerning where these far left ideas went and what they mean today. But she reminds us that politics and art are ever-evolving outlets for our collective learning and dreaming—and in Patten’s case, despite let-downs, disagreements, and arrests, that remains eternal.
The Miscellaneous Projects of Daniel Tucker

Book Review: Revolution as an Eternal Dream by Mary Patten

This Book Review appeared in Afterimage Vol. 39 No. 5 in the Spring of 2012:

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective

by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette/Half Letter Press/2011/84 pp./$13.00 (sb) [Purchase it here]

It is all too rare to see social movement history interwoven with art history—so what a pleasure it is to read Mary Patten’s memoir, which does exactly that. Patten recounts, through short essays paired with full-color graphics reproductions, her days in the May 19th Communist organization, working with particular commitment in the graphics and propaganda subcommittee known as the Madame Binh Graphics Collective from 1975 to 1983.

The text is sewn together with prose that critically comments on cadre activism from a mature, deeply honest, and self-reflexive position. Patten writes, “We were on the margins of the margins, the periphery of the periphery: far left or ‘ultra left’ in our intensely florid and dramatic politics.[PAGE 11]“ Later she introduces how art fit into these politics, elegantly explaining their approach to authorship and anonymity: “Those who choose this kind of political art practice find their lives intensely enriched and multiply connected to worlds beyond what they ever knew previously; worlds where possibilities beckon, and where ‘losing oneself’ also means sacrifice, sometimes to the point of self-obliteration.”[PAGE 49]

This book is unusual for a number of reasons. It is less a book than an essay, but an essay that is elaborated upon and contextualized by both a preface and an afterword. It is less a history than a memoir; a catalog, but without an accompanying exhibition. It is similar to a pamphlet, but with full color artwork never found in leftist propaganda.

I highly recommend this book to printmakers, politically motivated artists of any kind, and anyone interested in the way that art intersects with leftist history in general. Patten’s approach leaves many questions open concerning where these far left ideas went and what they mean today. But she reminds us that politics and art are ever-evolving outlets for our collective learning and dreaming—and in Patten’s case, despite let-downs, disagreements, and arrests, that remains eternal.

The Miscellaneous Projects of Daniel Tucker

Those of you in Philadelphia and New York City have a chance to meet author, activist, and artist Mary Patten at the end of January! 
Philadelphia: Friday, Jan. 27 at 1 pm at The Print Center, 1614 Latimer St.
New York City: Saturday, Jan. 28 at 7 pm at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen St.
Mary will be reading from her book Revolution As An Eternal Dream: The Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective at both events. Books will be available for sale and Salem from Temporary Services and Half Letter Press will be present as well. 
East Coast, hope to see you soon!

Those of you in Philadelphia and New York City have a chance to meet author, activist, and artist Mary Patten at the end of January! 

Philadelphia: Friday, Jan. 27 at 1 pm at The Print Center, 1614 Latimer St.

New York City: Saturday, Jan. 28 at 7 pm at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen St.

Mary will be reading from her book Revolution As An Eternal Dream: The Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective at both events. Books will be available for sale and Salem from Temporary Services and Half Letter Press will be present as well. 

East Coast, hope to see you soon!

Time is running out on our contest! We will give away a  free copy signed by Mary Patten to one random person that reblogs this post. You have until midnight Central time on September 16th to reblog  this and then we’ll pick a winner.
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame  Binh  Graphics Collective (MBGC) examines the political practice and  visual  propaganda of a now-obscure women’s poster, printmaking, and  street art  collective based in New York City between 1975 and 1983. For  a brief,  intense period of time, the MBGC collaborated on projects  against racism  and in solidarity with national liberation movements,  producing many  beautiful multicolored silkscreened prints, note cards,  banners,  posters, and other print ephemera before withdrawing into the  isolation  of a sectarian and militaristic political line. By 1982 its  core members  were in prison or underground. Revolution as an Eternal  Dream calls up  the perpetual desire for revolution, but also the  frailty of such  dreams.
Please spread the word about this publication.

Time is running out on our contest! We will give away a free copy signed by Mary Patten to one random person that reblogs this post. You have until midnight Central time on September 16th to reblog this and then we’ll pick a winner.

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (MBGC) examines the political practice and visual propaganda of a now-obscure women’s poster, printmaking, and street art collective based in New York City between 1975 and 1983. For a brief, intense period of time, the MBGC collaborated on projects against racism and in solidarity with national liberation movements, producing many beautiful multicolored silkscreened prints, note cards, banners, posters, and other print ephemera before withdrawing into the isolation of a sectarian and militaristic political line. By 1982 its core members were in prison or underground. Revolution as an Eternal Dream calls up the perpetual desire for revolution, but also the frailty of such dreams.

Please spread the word about this publication.

The newest book published by Half Letter Press + a contest! 
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette
Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh  Graphics Collective (MBGC) examines the political practice and visual  propaganda of a now-obscure women’s poster, printmaking, and street art  collective based in New York City between 1975 and 1983. For a brief,  intense period of time, the MBGC collaborated on projects against racism  and in solidarity with national liberation movements, producing many  beautiful multicolored silkscreened prints, note cards, banners,  posters, and other print ephemera before withdrawing into the isolation  of a sectarian and militaristic political line. By 1982 its core members  were in prison or underground. Revolution as an Eternal Dream calls up  the perpetual desire for revolution, but also the frailty of such  dreams.
Please spread the word about this publication. We will give away a free copy signed by Mary Patten to one random person that reblogs this post. You have until midnight Central time on September 16th to reblog this and then we’ll pick a winner.
[Click the book cover for more details and a look inside]

The newest book published by Half Letter Press + a contest! 

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective by Mary Patten, with a preface by Lucy Lippard and an afterword by Gregory Sholette

Revolution as an Eternal Dream: the Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (MBGC) examines the political practice and visual propaganda of a now-obscure women’s poster, printmaking, and street art collective based in New York City between 1975 and 1983. For a brief, intense period of time, the MBGC collaborated on projects against racism and in solidarity with national liberation movements, producing many beautiful multicolored silkscreened prints, note cards, banners, posters, and other print ephemera before withdrawing into the isolation of a sectarian and militaristic political line. By 1982 its core members were in prison or underground. Revolution as an Eternal Dream calls up the perpetual desire for revolution, but also the frailty of such dreams.

Please spread the word about this publication. We will give away a free copy signed by Mary Patten to one random person that reblogs this post. You have until midnight Central time on September 16th to reblog this and then we’ll pick a winner.

[Click the book cover for more details and a look inside]

Revolution as an Eternal Dream (Madame Binh Graphics Collective book by Mary Patten)
An update and thank you!
Thank you very much to all  who have pledged their support so far. We are humbled by your generosity  and astonished that our goal was met so early in the campaign.
We started this publishing project with a $750 grant from the Fire  This Time Fund. Having never tried Kickstarter before, we decided to  play it safe and aim for $1200, although our budget is actually about  $3000.
If you are thinking of pledging, we could still greatly benefit from  your support. Any funds we raise in excess of our Kickstarter goal will  go toward increasing the print run and/or adding additional pages and  images.
Please continue to share our campaign with your friends and networks.  We will happily be able to furnish all donors at the various levels  with their respective rewards..
Thank you again for your support. We expect to have some exciting  announcements for you about new contributors to the book very soon so  stay tuned for that.
Lots of love, Temporary Services, Mary Patten and Heather Anderson

Revolution as an Eternal Dream (Madame Binh Graphics Collective book by Mary Patten)

An update and thank you!

Thank you very much to all who have pledged their support so far. We are humbled by your generosity and astonished that our goal was met so early in the campaign.

We started this publishing project with a $750 grant from the Fire This Time Fund. Having never tried Kickstarter before, we decided to play it safe and aim for $1200, although our budget is actually about $3000.

If you are thinking of pledging, we could still greatly benefit from your support. Any funds we raise in excess of our Kickstarter goal will go toward increasing the print run and/or adding additional pages and images.

Please continue to share our campaign with your friends and networks. We will happily be able to furnish all donors at the various levels with their respective rewards..

Thank you again for your support. We expect to have some exciting announcements for you about new contributors to the book very soon so stay tuned for that.

Lots of love,
Temporary Services, Mary Patten and Heather Anderson